Healthy Kids, Healthy Maryland

PROTECTING MARYLANDERS FROM TOXICS—Maryland PIRG is working with state lawmakers and our powerful coalition, connecting concerned citizens with their representatives, and reaching out to the media in our fight to make Maryland toxics-free.

Protecting Maryland Families

We need to do more to regulate toxic chemicals and prevent vulnerable populations, like women of reproductive age, developing children and factory workers from being unwittingly exposed to toxic chemicals.

Today, we are seeing the long-term impact that dangerous chemicals have on people. Leukemia, brain cancer and other childhood cancers have increased by more than 20% since 1975; asthma rates have doubled since 1980; and autism diagnoses have increased tenfold in the last 15 years.

OUR COMMONSENSE STEPS TO A TOXIC-FREE MARYLAND

Our campaign pushes for concrete steps that will help make it easier for Marylanders to protect themselves from toxic chemicals.

The Healthy Kids, Healthy Maryland platform calls for three commonsense steps to protect Marylanders from toxic chemical exposure:

  • Phase out chemicals we know are dangerous, and replace them with safest alternatives available;
  • Provide consumers with health and safety information about the presence of toxic chemicals in everyday products; and
  • Support and encourage research, innovation, education and technology transfer in the field of green chemistry, making Maryland a leader in safe product development.

Issue updates

Blog Post | COVID-19, Public Health

Nursing homes still don’t have enough masks, gowns and other PPE | Teresa Murray

Shortages improved during the fall but worsened in December

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Public Health

Nursing homes across the country still need more PPE | Teresa Murray

It’s unconscionable that some of our most vulnerable populations and their caregivers are being put in such danger during a global pandemic. But it doesn’t have to be this way — not if our country acts right now to ramp up production and distribution of PPE to where it’s needed most.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Consumer Tips, COVID-19, Public Health

20 Questions to Ask Your Nursing Home during COVID | Teresa Murray

Whether you have a loved one currently in a nursing home or rehabilitation facility, or whether you’re shopping for one, you should arm yourself with a list of questions to gauge how safe the environment is. Here’s a guide to those questions, and the answers you should expect.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Maryland PIRG | Public Health

Statement: Baltimore City Council Passes Ban on Toxic Pesticides

The Baltimore City Council voted in favor of a new comprehensive regulation on pesticides (CB 20-0495). The bill restricts the use of chlorpyrifos, neonicotinoids and glyphosate (the main ingredient in the popular weed killer RoundUp) in Baltimore City. The regulation will go into effect on July 1, 2022. 

> Keep Reading
News Release | Maryland PIRG | COVID-19, Public Health

Maryland PIRG Statement on Gov. Hogan Restaurant Capacity Announcement

Baltimore - Gov. Larry Hogan announced Friday that he is loosening coronavirus restrictions on indoor dining. Starting Monday, September 21st at 5:00pm restaurants will be allowed to operate at 75 percent capacity for indoor dining, up from 50%. 

> Keep Reading

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News Release | Maryland PIRG | Public Health

Statement: Baltimore City Council Passes Ban on Toxic Pesticides

The Baltimore City Council voted in favor of a new comprehensive regulation on pesticides (CB 20-0495). The bill restricts the use of chlorpyrifos, neonicotinoids and glyphosate (the main ingredient in the popular weed killer RoundUp) in Baltimore City. The regulation will go into effect on July 1, 2022. 

> Keep Reading
News Release | Maryland PIRG | COVID-19, Public Health

Maryland PIRG Statement on Gov. Hogan Restaurant Capacity Announcement

Baltimore - Gov. Larry Hogan announced Friday that he is loosening coronavirus restrictions on indoor dining. Starting Monday, September 21st at 5:00pm restaurants will be allowed to operate at 75 percent capacity for indoor dining, up from 50%. 

> Keep Reading
News Release | Maryland PIRG | COVID-19, Public Health

Maryland PIRG tells Governor Hogan it’s time to shut down, start over and do it right

Baltimore-- Maryland PIRG is calling on Governor Hogan to hit the reset button on the state’s response to containing the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as cases and hospitalizations increase.

> Keep Reading
News Release | COVID-19, Public Health

As jursidictions begin reopenning, let's follow advice from public health experts

Baltimore: On May 13, Governor Hogan announced plans to lift the statewide stay at home order and ease state restrictions on retail, manufacturing, houses of worship, and some personal services. His announcement gives individual jurisdictions power to make decisions regarding the timing of reopening locally.

> Keep Reading

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Result | Public Health

Protecting Marylanders from toxic lawn chemicals

Toxic chemicals in lawn pesticides pollute our environment and our health. These chemicals can drift into our air, waterways and homes. In 2015, Maryland PIRG helped win restrictions on toxic lawn pesticides in Montgomery County. The restrictions allow only safe pesticides to be used on lawns, playgrounds, recreation areas and children’s facilities’ grounds.

> Keep Reading
Result | Public Health

Convincing McDonald’s and Subway to protect public health

In 2015, bolstered by the support of more than 100,000 members and supporters, we convinced both McDonald’s and Subway to take action to protect public health. In March, just two days after we delivered more than 30,000 petitions to McDonald’s headquarters, the company announced that they would stop serving chicken raised on medically-important antibiotics. And in October, after more than 100,000 called on the chain to take action, Subway announced a similar policy for all the meat they serve.

> Keep Reading
Result | Public Health

Victory: Macy's commits to phase out toxic flame retardents

We did it: Macy's announced it will stop selling furniture that contains toxic flame retardants.

> Keep Reading
Result | Public Health

Victory: Subway Announces Plan to Go Antibiotic Free

We're ecstatic that Subway will be living up to the healthy image they've created. They have more restaurants in the U.S. than any other chain, and their announcement will put major market pressure on the meat producers to stop overusing antibiotics.

> Keep Reading
Result | Public Health

KIDS’ SCHOOL LUNCHES NOW SAFER

For years, America’s schoolchildren have been eating beef, chicken and other foods that would have been rejected as substandard even by fast food chains. Thanks in part to our advocacy, the U.S.D.A. has stopped buying such low-quality meat for school lunches.

> Keep Reading
Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Public Health

Chain Reaction V

The Chain Reaction V report grades the top fast food and fast casual chanins on antibiotic use policies for their beef supply chains. 

> Keep Reading
Report | Maryland PIRG | Public Health

Get the Lead Out

Our children need safe drinking water – especially at school where they go to learn and play each day.  Unfortunately, lead is contaminating drinking water at schools and pre-schools across the country.  As our report shows, states are failing to make the grade when it comes to keeping lead out of drinking water at school.  Instead of waiting for more testing, we need to proactively remove the lead pipes and plumbing at the root of this toxic hazard for our children.

> Keep Reading
Report | Maryland PIRG Foundation | Public Health, Consumer Protection

HOW SAFE IS OUR FOOD?

While our food safety system has improved significantly over the last 100 years, when toxics, fake foodstuffs and bacteria regularly infiltrated the supply, it is clear there is more work to do. A modern society relies on ensuring that the daily act of eating does not undermine the health of the population. 

> Keep Reading
Report | Maryland PIRG Foundation and Ecology Center | Public Health, Consumer Protection

Hidden Hazards

The Ecology Center's has released test results and product ratings in their 2018 report, Hidden Hazards: Flame Retardants & PFAS in Children's Car Seats. 

> Keep Reading
Report | Maryland PIRG Foundation | Public Health, Consumer Protection

Trouble in Toyland

For over 30 years, Maryland PIRG Foundation has conducted an annual survey of toys to look for safety problems. This research has led to more than 150 toy recalls and other regulatory actions over the years. Our work has also helped educate the public and policymakers on the need for continued action to protect the health and well-being of children. 

> Keep Reading

Pages

Blog Post | COVID-19, Public Health

Nursing homes still don’t have enough masks, gowns and other PPE | Teresa Murray

Shortages improved during the fall but worsened in December

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Public Health

Nursing homes across the country still need more PPE | Teresa Murray

It’s unconscionable that some of our most vulnerable populations and their caregivers are being put in such danger during a global pandemic. But it doesn’t have to be this way — not if our country acts right now to ramp up production and distribution of PPE to where it’s needed most.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Consumer Tips, COVID-19, Public Health

20 Questions to Ask Your Nursing Home during COVID | Teresa Murray

Whether you have a loved one currently in a nursing home or rehabilitation facility, or whether you’re shopping for one, you should arm yourself with a list of questions to gauge how safe the environment is. Here’s a guide to those questions, and the answers you should expect.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | COVID-19, Public Health

Is Maryland Effectively Containing COVID-19? 7/27/2020 | Emily Scarr

Our weekly trends and risk assessment report on COVID-19 in Maryland.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | COVID-19, Public Health

Letter to Hogan: 1000 health professionals call for action | Emily Scarr

Along with U.S. PIRG and more than 1000 health professionals, we are calling on our decision makers to shut down, start over, and do it right. 

> Keep Reading

Pages

Blog Post | Public Health, Antibiotics

Superbugs Unplugged: PIRG launches podcast about antibiotic resistance

Get ready for some alarming stories—and they're all the more alarming because they're true.

On Nov. 14, U.S. PIRG and the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center (ARAC) of George Washington University launched "Superbugs Unplugged," a podcast that will dive into the alarming issue of antibiotic resistance and how we can slow it. Matt Wellington, our Stop the Overuse of Antibiotics campaign director, is co-hosting the podcast, along with Dr. Lance Price of ARAC. 

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Public Health

Kids are back at school. How do we make sure their water is safe to drink?

It's not just Flint or Newark. Parents and teachers are concerned about lead in drinking water throughout the country. And they're looking for steps they can take to get the lead out.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Public Health, Antibiotics

These lawmakers are urging the EPA to protect our life-saving medicines

U.S. lawmakers have sent a blunt message to the Trump Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Spraying antibiotics on citrus will "escalate [the] antibiotic resistance crisis."

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Public Health

Amazon: Take responsibility for unsafe products

Most of us expect that the products we buy in stores are safe to use. It turns out that's not always the case with Amazon. 

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Public Health

Public education, member action strengthen call to ban Roundup

The more we educate the public about Monsanto's weedkiller, Roundup, the more support we find for banning the product—the residue of which can be found practically everywhere, from breakfast cereal to ice cream.

> Keep Reading

Pages

Blog Post

Shortages improved during the fall but worsened in December

Blog Post

It’s unconscionable that some of our most vulnerable populations and their caregivers are being put in such danger during a global pandemic. But it doesn’t have to be this way — not if our country acts right now to ramp up production and distribution of PPE to where it’s needed most.

Blog Post

Whether you have a loved one currently in a nursing home or rehabilitation facility, or whether you’re shopping for one, you should arm yourself with a list of questions to gauge how safe the environment is. Here’s a guide to those questions, and the answers you should expect.

News Release | Maryland PIRG

The Baltimore City Council voted in favor of a new comprehensive regulation on pesticides (CB 20-0495). The bill restricts the use of chlorpyrifos, neonicotinoids and glyphosate (the main ingredient in the popular weed killer RoundUp) in Baltimore City. The regulation will go into effect on July 1, 2022. 

News Release | Maryland PIRG

Baltimore - Gov. Larry Hogan announced Friday that he is loosening coronavirus restrictions on indoor dining. Starting Monday, September 21st at 5:00pm restaurants will be allowed to operate at 75 percent capacity for indoor dining, up from 50%. 

Public Health

Protecting Marylanders from toxic ‘forever chemicals’

PFAS are a class of chemicals commonly used in cookware, food packaging, outdoor apparel, carpets and firefighting foams. They have been linked to cancer and other serious illnesses — and in order to protect our communities from this public health threat, we need to address PFAS contamination in our food, water, consumer products and environment.

 

Public Health

Baltimore puts public health over toxic pesticides

The Baltimore City Council has passed a bill that restricts the use of three toxic pesticides: chlorpyrifos, neonicotinoids and glyphosate (the main ingredient in the popular weed killer Roundup). Glyphosate and chlorpyrifos have been linked to severe health issues, while neonicotinoids contribute the decline in bee populations, which threatens our ecosystems and food production.

 

Public Health

Economists call for states to shut down, contain coronavirus before reopening

Economists from leading universities have signed an open letter to decision-makers urging them to scale back reopening in states that fail to meet public health benchmarks, saying the economic crisis brought on by the coronavirus will continue as long as the virus goes uncontained.

 

Public Health

Maryland PIRG: Gov. Hogan should support local COVID-19 precautions, not restrict them

Gov. Larry Hogan has announced an emergency order prohibiting local governments within Maryland from issuing blanket closures of schools. Maryland PIRG opposes this decision — if local governments assess that temporarily closing schools during the coronavirus pandemic is best for public health, they shouldn't be barred from doing so.

 
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