UPDATE: 28 groups call on Gov. Hogan to reduce diesel pollution

Today we joined 28 groups who sent a letter urging Governor Hogan to reduce diesel pollution by swiftly adopting both the Advanced Clean Trucks Rule and the Heavy-Duty Omnibus Rule to tackle climate change and improve public health. 

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Emily Scarr
Maryland PIRG State Director

Author: Emily Scarr

Maryland PIRG State Director

(410) 467-9389

Started on staff: 2005
B.A., Vassar College

Emily directs strategy, organizational development, research, communications and legislative advocacy for Maryland PIRG. Since joining Maryland PIRG in 2013, Emily has won reforms to strengthen our democrarcy, improve public health, and protect consumers.

She has helped lead efforts to establish small donor public financing programs throughout the state and helped update and modernize the small donor public financing program for Maryland candidates for governor. She has worked with partners to enable Election Day voter registration and automatic voter registration in Maryland. She spearheaded efforts to pass the Family and Firefighter Protection Act to ban flame retardants in children's products, furniture and mattresses, and the George "Walter" Taylor Act to restrict the use and disposal of toxic PFAS "forever chemicals." She lead efforts to pass the Maryland Keep Antibiotics Effective Act to protect public health by restricting the use of antibiotics on Maryland farms and the Safe School Drinking Water Act to require testing and remediation for lead in school drinking water.

Emily serves on the Executive Committees of the Maryland Fair Elections Coalition and the Maryland Campaign to Keep Antibiotics Working. She also serves on the Steering Committees for the Maryland Pesticide Action Network and Marylanders for Open Government. Emily lives in Baltimore with her husband, children, and dog.

Today we joined 28 groups who sent a letter urging Governor Hogan to reduce diesel pollution by swiftly adopting both the Advanced Clean Trucks Rule and the Heavy-Duty Omnibus Rule to tackle climate change and improve public health. 

The Advanced Clean Trucks Rule puts on a path of mandating an increasingly higher number of electric trucks sold in the state starting in 2025, and ramping up for more than a decade. 

Diesel fumes from medium and heavy duty trucks on the road is a true health hazard. 

By enacting this rule, Maryland would join a growing number of states adopting the Advanced Clean Truck Rule, including California, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Washington, and Oregon. Doing so would also help Maryland follow through on its commitment for 30% of all medium and heavy duty vehicles sales to be electric by 2030.

Emily Scarr
Maryland PIRG State Director

Author: Emily Scarr

Maryland PIRG State Director

(410) 467-9389

Started on staff: 2005
B.A., Vassar College

Emily directs strategy, organizational development, research, communications and legislative advocacy for Maryland PIRG. Since joining Maryland PIRG in 2013, Emily has won reforms to strengthen our democrarcy, improve public health, and protect consumers.

She has helped lead efforts to establish small donor public financing programs throughout the state and helped update and modernize the small donor public financing program for Maryland candidates for governor. She has worked with partners to enable Election Day voter registration and automatic voter registration in Maryland. She spearheaded efforts to pass the Family and Firefighter Protection Act to ban flame retardants in children's products, furniture and mattresses, and the George "Walter" Taylor Act to restrict the use and disposal of toxic PFAS "forever chemicals." She lead efforts to pass the Maryland Keep Antibiotics Effective Act to protect public health by restricting the use of antibiotics on Maryland farms and the Safe School Drinking Water Act to require testing and remediation for lead in school drinking water.

Emily serves on the Executive Committees of the Maryland Fair Elections Coalition and the Maryland Campaign to Keep Antibiotics Working. She also serves on the Steering Committees for the Maryland Pesticide Action Network and Marylanders for Open Government. Emily lives in Baltimore with her husband, children, and dog.