Maryland PIRG Foundation sheds light on big money's role in Baltimore elections

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Gina Goldenberg
Creative Associate

Author: Gina Goldenberg

Creative Associate

Started on staff: 2021
B.A., magna cum laude and Sigma Theta Delta, Wake Forest University

Gina writes, edits and designs materials for the PIRG state groups. Gina lives in Boston where she enjoys reading, running and spending time with friends.

In Baltimore, special interest money has dominated funding for mayoral campaigns for too long.

According to an Oct. 20 Maryland PIRG Foundation report, 80% of the funds raised for 2020 Baltimore mayoral campaigns were raised by people and entities who weren't even eligible to vote in the city's elections. To combat this, voters passed a new small-donor financing program designed to benefit voters, candidates and Baltimore as whole. The new program will take effect for the 2024 elections.

“How electoral campaigns are financed matters," said Rishi Shah, an advocate for Maryland PIRG. "Voters should be in the driver's seat of our elections, not wealthy and corporate donors."

"It’s my hope that the coming implementation of the Baltimore City Fair Election Fund, which was approved by voters in 2018, will reshape the political field in Baltimore City and allow for grassroots funded campaigns to have a better shot at winning elections,” Rishi added.

Read more.

Learn more about our Big Money Out campaign.

Photo: On average, competitive candidates spend over $1 million each over the course of the election. Credit: Royalty-free politicians via pxfuel, CC0

Gina Goldenberg
Creative Associate

Author: Gina Goldenberg

Creative Associate

Started on staff: 2021
B.A., magna cum laude and Sigma Theta Delta, Wake Forest University

Gina writes, edits and designs materials for the PIRG state groups. Gina lives in Boston where she enjoys reading, running and spending time with friends.