Public Health

Report | Maryland PIRG and Consumers Union | Public Health

Prescription For Change

Our September 2014 survey of physicians paints a grim picture of the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant infections. The overwhelming majority of surveyed doctors reported that one or more of their patients had been diagnosed with a presumed or confirmed case of a multi-drug resistant bacterial infection in the past twelve months. They also expressed concern about the use of antibiotics in livestock production facilities on healthy animals in order to promote growth and prevent disease.

News Release | U.S. PIRG | Public Health

Some Good, Some Bad in Obama Executive Order on Protecting Antibiotics

Today, President Barack Obama issued an Executive Order – Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria. While the order takes several important steps necessary to control the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, it misses the opportunity to call for critical reforms in the agricultural sector that are essential to protect public health.

Report | Maryland PIRG Foundation | Public Health

Weak Medicine

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria infect more than 2 million people per year in the United States, causing more than 23,000 deaths. State governments, the FDA and other branches of the federal government should take steps to protect human health from the antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can develop on factory farms.

News Release | Maryland PIRG Foundation | Public Health

Report: Toxic Chemicals Widespread in Children’s Products

 

Baltimore, MD – Makers of children’s products have reported widespread use of hazardous chemicals under the landmark Washington state 2008 Children’s Safe Products Act (CSPA). “What’s on Your List? Toxic Chemicals in Your Shopping Cart,” reveals the prevalence of chemicals that can cause cancer, hormone disruption, and reproductive and developmental problems in products readily available for purchase at many of the country’s largest retailers.

Report | Maryland PIRG Foundation and Washington Toxics Coalition | Public Health

What's on Your List?

Parents want and expect the products they use to care for their children to be safe and free of harmful chemicals. But our nation’s toxic chemical laws are weak and ineffective and many harmful chemicals get into everyday consumer products without the public’s knowledge. Taking steps to remedy this problem, Washington State passed the Children’s Safe Products Act in 2008 (CSPA). CSPA set up requirements for makers of children’s products being sold in Washington to report to the state if these products contain chemicals on a list of 66 Chemicals of High Concern to Children. Manufacturer reporting began phasing-in in 2012. This document summarizes the chemicals and products reported from March 5 to September 6 of 2013.

Overall there were 4,605 reports of Chemicals of High Concern to Children reported in children’s products such as toys, clothing, baby safety products, and bedding during this time period. A total of 78 companies such as Walmart, Target, Safeway, Walgreens, Nike, and Toys “R” Us reported products containing harmful chemicals. A total of 49 chemicals such as formaldehyde, bisphenol A (BPA), parabens, phthalates, heavy metals, and industrial solvents were reported. The health effects of reported chemicals include carcinogenicity, endocrine disruption, and developmental or reproductive toxicity. This time period of reporting showed new companies reporting and showed new products being reported such as children’s tableware containing formaldehyde and toy vehicles containing antimony trioxide flame retardant. 

Washington’s reporting law is achievable for the business community. More states should be passing these laws so families have chemical information about products being sold where they live. Retailers should remove products containing toxic chemicals from their store shelves. Ultimately, companies should phase these chemicals out of use and Congress should strengthen and update the federal Toxic Substances Control Act. Families can help bring about these changes by taking action.

Studies link chlorinated Tris to neurological damage, hormone disruption, mutagenicity and cancer,    and it has the same chemical structure as banned chemicals like DDT, PCBs and Dioxin. Chlorinated Tris tested positive for mutagenicity in the 1970s and as a result it was voluntarily removed from children’s pajamas in 1977. Since the action was voluntary, companies can legally use it in other consumer products without informing government officials or the public.

Media Hit | Public Health

Indoor Chemical Exposure Linked to Childhood Asthma

According to a report by the Maryland Public Interest Research Group, common household products could cause your child to develop asthma. The report found that exposure to chemicals in common consumer products, such as air fresheners or cleaning supplies, can cause or aggravate childhood asthma. "A large and growing body of scientific research shows that many chemicals and consumer products and building materials are found in the air and are linked to asthma and asthma symptoms," Joanna Guy from the Maryland PIRG said. As of 2010, the number of children with asthma in Maryland exceeded the national percentage. In Baltimore City, about 40 percent of students are diagnosed with the disease and it is listed as the leading cause of absences. The Maryland PIRG is calling on the governor to publish a list of the chemicals. 

Read More at: http://www.foxbaltimore.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/report-indoor-chemical-exposure-linked-childhood-asthma-24145.shtml#.UrhpoSRQ1wt

News Release | Maryland PIRG Foundation | Public Health

REPORT: CHEMICALS IN COMMON CONSUMER PRODUCTS LINKED TO CHILDHOOD ASTHMA

A new report, released today by Maryland PIRG (Public Interest Research Group) Foundation, found that exposure to chemicals in common consumer products can cause or aggravate childhood asthma.

Report | Maryland PIRG Foundation | Public Health

An Unnecessary Burden

A large and growing body of scientific research shows that many chemicals in consumer products and building materials are linked to asthma and asthma symptoms.

"Trouble in Toyland" report warns of toy hazards

Concerned about inadvertently stuffing the stockings with lead or other dangerous metals and chemicals? The Maryland Public Interest Research Group has just the study for you. Its "Trouble in Toyland" report -- the 28th annual toy-safety survey by U.S. PIRG and its state affiliates -- warns people to "be wary when shopping this holiday season." Though researchers have seen improvements over the years, they're still finding problems ranging from high levels of lead to choking hazards.

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